Taking Action

Choosing our priorities

When choosing our priorities, our members wanted to create local evidence for why we invest in prevention in the Growing North.  Australia spends less than 2% of its annual health budget on prevention. The Growing North doesn't wait for funding or change to come to us, we create the change we want to see! 

 

Poor health outcomes and health gaps between population groups are not acceptable to us. When you are sick, you want to know that the health system is working for you, for your best health outcomes. When you are well, you want to stay well.

 

The ability to navigate care options and health information is critical for individual, family and community health and wellbeing. Building on the strengths and expertise of members, our priorities reflect where we can achieve the greatest impact for our diverse communities.

Healthy Systems

A Healthy System to us, is a health system that is focused on prevention. Prevention of waste: no wasted time, all aspects of the health system centres around helping people get well and stay well. It means working smarter, connected and maximises return on  investment. A healthy system creates value for its consumers. It is easy to navigate, is culturally safe and to the consumer, works seamlessly. 

We focus on system integration, quality, access and value.

Healthy Children and Families

We take a life course approach to prevention and believe that the health and wellbeing of children and families starts with healthy women. Families are much more than groups of individuals. They also are places where every child and adult deserve to be live healthy lives. The foundations for the health of the and wellbeing of the Growing North are built during childhood and earlier.  We want a health system that supports the changing health and wellbeing needs of families.

We focus on preventing violence against women and children, improving antenatal health and preventing childhood obesity.

Healthy Communities

When everyone has the opportunity to live their healthiest lives, we are all better off. Our communities are thinking in new ways about the many factors and systems that influence their health, from education and housing to transportation and food security. We want to embed Aboriginal self-determination in health services in the Growing North - building respectful and culturally safe health care for all.

We focus on the disease prevention, bridging gaps in health outcomes and the social determinants of health.

Health leaders

 

Great leadership requires vision, trust and compassion. Our members define a great heath leader as someone who inspiring others with courage, is agile and focused on building relationships to meet the objectives of Shared Vision for the Growing North.

 

Great health leaders leverage their expertise and the expertise of those around them to challenge the status quo, share compelling stories about the health challenges and successes of the Growing North to inform impactful change. In the Growing North we value health leaders who authentically advocate for the health and care needs of our diverse communities.

 

A great leader acts with heart (building connections), their head (seeking to understand), and their gut (building capacity of the health sector and our communities).

Each month we profile a Growing North health leader. Read more below.

ABOUT MAX

 

Max Lee has been leading the Hume Whittlesea Primary Care Partnership for over 8 years. Being a backbone organisation means you broker local health outcomes on behalf of others, sometimes during market failure, usually without any resources, and definitely no limelight. 

 

Max has a unique way of bringing people together. He is trusted by members to know who the right people and organisations are to form a partnership with to get the best health outcomes for the Growing North communities. We asked Max for some sage advice. 

 

Q&A with Max:

Q: What do you think are your best skills as a leader?

A: I hope that others see me as inclusive and clear. I am driven by curiosity and driven by outcomes.

 

Q: What do you think is the hardest skills to learn as a leader?

A: Waiting is the hardest skill. Some things just take time. Be patient. Wisdom doesn’t come in predefined packages.

 

Q: What advice to you give the health leaders of tomorrow?

A: Listen and look more, speak less. Never underestimate the power of listening and observing, it is fundamental to developing a shared understanding. Listen for the realities of what others are saying. Adapt to differences. Test your assumptions with the people you are engaging with.

 

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We are proud to acknowledge the Wurundjeri people as the traditional owners of the land on which Shared Vision for the Growing North is based. We pay respect to elders past, present and emerging.

We are committed to reconciliation and ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a voice in their health and wellbeing.

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Supporting the rights, health and wellbeing of people who identify as LGBTIQ.